Skeet teamFinance major Vidal A. Cantu Jr. describes himself as a “competition junkie.” After aiding the Texas A&M University Trap and Skeet team in winning the National Championship title for the first time since 1982 as a sophomore, he shows no signs of slowing. “My decision to come to Texas A&M was driven by the camaraderie that I see with the Aggie family, the Aggie spirit, its rich traditions and the opportunities and quality education that is provided here at Mays,” said the 19-year-old.

Cantu has an internship at LPL Financial office in his hometown of Laredo, Texas. He is a member of the Texas A&M branch of the Texas Dove Hunters Association, plays intramural softball and plans to apply this fall for the Traditions and Business Student Councils. He also plans to study abroad in Stuttgart, Germany in the summer of 2016.

He credits Mays Business School, the Trap and Skeet team and both of his grandfathers who started their own businesses from the ground up with keeping his competitive spirit alive – not just as a marksman but also in other aspects of his life.

“I thoroughly enjoy rivalry and competition, and I have always wanted to do something on my own and have this same sense of pride that comes with owning a business,” he said. “I know that Mays is going to help me achieve this success.”

After his graduation in 2018, he plans to further pursue his education and earn an MBA at Texas A&M.

“I truly fell in love with the school,” Cantu said. “I hope to learn more about the field of finance and become a skilled investor and entrepreneur.”

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOLCantu family

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,900 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, business, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Catagories: Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M, Uncategorized

Five business graduates are among those given 2015 Distinguished Alumnus Award – the highest honor bestowed upon a former student of Texas A&M University, awarded since 1962 to fewer than 250 of Texas A&M’s 425,000 former students. Presented jointly by the university and The Association of Former Students, this award recognizes Aggies who have achieved excellence in their chosen professions and made meaningful contributions to Texas A&M University and their local communities.

Stanton P. Bell ’54, bachelor’s in business administration, built and leads Bell Hydrogas, a propane company serving San Antonio and six counties. He served five years as captain of the 12th Man Foundation’s Champions Council and, among the San Antonio organizations he has worked for and led, he was elected King Antonio of Fiesta 1989 and has been a director of Boysville and the Santa Rosa Children’s Hospital Foundation. He is a past president of the San Antonio Better Business Bureau and a former director of the Greater San Antonio Chamber of Commerce. He has served as a director of Compass Bank, Mission Gas Corp. and the Valero Texas Open Golf Tournament. He received a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Texas A&M. He served in the 24th Infantry Division in Korea and was selected as aide de camp to the commanding general. He is a past president of the Rotary Club of San Antonio and also a past president of the San Antonio Country Club, club golf champion and five-time club senior golf champion.

Lupe Fraga ’57, bachelor’s in accounting, built Tejas Office Products into one of Houston’s largest minority-owned businesses and has championed Houston and A&M through work that includes chairing the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Federal Reserve Bank’s Houston branch and serving as an Texas A&M University System regent from 2005 to 2011. His company made the Aggie 100 both in the list’s inaugural year and in 2011 and has been listed in the Hispanic Business Magazine Top 500 Companies. He has chaired the Greater Houston Visitors and Convention Bureau and Harris County Child Protective Services and was honored as one of 2004’s Fathers of the Year by Community Partners. He received a bachelor’s degree in accounting at Texas A&M and in 2003 was named a Texas A&M Mays Business School Outstanding Alumnus. He was honored by the Houston Aggie Moms’ Club in February 2015. He has been a trustee of St. Thomas University and has served other organizations including the Galveston-Houston Catholic Diocese, Metropolitan and National YMCA, Sam Houston Area Boy Scouts and United Way Gulf Coast Chapter.

Ray Hannigan ’61, bachelor’s in general business, rose to CEO of an international hospital equipment company and has used his abilities to educate and create opportunities for other Aggies to succeed globally. His involvement with Texas A&M’s Mays Business School has included serving on the advisory council to the Center for International Business Studies, serving as a guest lecturer and, in 1997, receiving the Outstanding Alumnus Award (he received a bachelor’s degree in general business from A&M). He was president and CEO of Kinetic Concepts Inc. from 1994 to 2000; before that, he was president of the international division of Sterling Drug (Eastman Kodak) and president of Beecham SmithKlein Canada. Appointed by Gov. Rick Perry ’72 to the State Board of Health in 2001, he served four years. In San Antonio, he has served on the board of directors for Christus Santa Rosa Hospital, Our Lady of the Lake University and Southwest Research Foundation. He serves as a Meals on Wheels volunteer in Bryan and has served on the leadership council of St. Mary’s Catholic Center in College Station.

Frederick W. Heldenfels IV ’79, bachelor’s in business administration, has served Texas colleges and universities as chair of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating board and has served as chairman of the 12th Man Foundation board of trustees and twice as a member of its executive committee. He is the current chairman of the A&M PAC Board. He is founder, president and CEO of Heldenfels Enterprises, Inc., an Aggie 100 award recipient in 2005, 2006 and 2010. He has chaired the industry’s national trade organization, the Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute, and was inducted into the Corpus Christi Business Hall of Fame in 2010. He is a past chairman of both the Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi Foundation and the Corpus Christi Chamber of Commerce, where he helped initiate support for tort reform in the Coastal Bend and creation of a four-year university within the Texas A&M University System. He received a bachelor’s degree in business administration at Texas A&M. He has long taught Sunday school classes at Hyde Park Baptist Church and serves on the Austin Chamber of Commerce board as vice chair of state advocacy.

Carri Baker Wells ’84, bachelor’s in marketing, is COO for the San Antonio office of Linebarger Goggan Blair & Sampson, LLP, a firm she has helped lead to national recognition in serving governments at all levels in collecting receivables. She was chairman of the 12th Man Foundation and led projects such as Kyle Field’s successful Zone Club, a critical asset to raising funds for expansion. She chaired the Greater San Antonio Chamber of Commerce and has been inducted into the San Antonio Women’s Hall of Fame. She has held numerous civic leadership roles including co-founder and chair of the San Antonio ISD Foundation, an organization that is investing more than $1 million annually to ignite innovation and excellence in inner city schools. She is a board member for Girl Scouts of the USA and has received the highest honor given by a Girl Scout Council, the Trefoil Award. She served on the board of the San Antonio A&M Club and currently serves on the development council of A&M’s Mays Business School.

Since the inception of the award in 1962, fewer than 250 of Texas A&M’s 425,000 former students have been recognized with the Distinguished Alumnus Award, the highest honor Texas A&M University bestows upon a former student.

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,900 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, business, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

 

 

Catagories: Students, Texas A&M

A group of educators and students from the University of Zambia visited Mays Business School on May 14. It was a reciprocal visit after a group of 15 Regents’ Scholars visited the southern African nation in the summer of 2014. Phillips 66 sponsored that two-week trip.

Mays lecturer Henry Musoma (left) and Associate Dean Marty Loudder (center) hosted the group. It was the first visit to America for Patricia Mwila Sakala, acting manager of international link office; Lastone Trywell Zgambo, dean of students; Martin Nundwe, vice president of the University of Zambia Student Union (Unzasu); and Chinyama Jack Simasiuj, Unzasu academic affairs secretary.

Zambia friends

Catagories: Faculty, Mays Business, Students, Texas A&M

Student leadership organization Fish Aides seeks to empower not only its members, but also every individual that its members encounter, through encouragement, enthusiasm and service.

To give back to those who have served the university daily and to provide freshmen students an environment to grow and learn from one another, Fish Aides hosted its third annual Custodial Appreciation Banquet in the Bethancourt Ballroom on May 4. Last year the banquet was given a “Program of the Year” award at the Student Government Association Awards banquet.

The banquet serves as a way to thank the people who maintain the cleanliness of Texas A&M University campus, said event director and Business Honors senior Hunter Dansby. “These hundreds of people we see throughout the day working diligently to ensure that we have a great experience at Texas A&M are frequently not thanked or go unnoticed,” he said. “This event seeks to say one big ‘Thank You’ to all of those who work tirelessly for us. It is a special event because it is one of the very few times that the students get to serve their custodians.”

The event is free each year for all university custodians. Fish Aide members solicit donations to cover the cost of the ballroom rental, food and prizes.

Fish-Aides

Fish Aides is composed of 40 freshmen, four sophomore co-chairs, two junior assistant directors and one executive director. Members can advance to the position of director after serving as a co-chair and assistant director.

The 2015 director said he had a great year. “If I did not love this organization, I would not have committed my four years of college to it,” Dansby said. “I have loved my experience as director — I love leading and being on a team that spends most of our time investing in the lives of 40 young freshmen. It is a very rewarding experience.”

Dansby is also active in Brotherhood of Christian Aggies, Mays Business School Titans of Investing Group XIX and Mays Business Fellows Group XXXII. Upon graduation in May, he has committed to teaching high school math in Durham, N.C., through Teach For America.

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,900 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

 

Catagories: Mays Business, Students

Eighteen-year-old Arden Robertson is unclassifiable. According to her age she is a freshman, at football games for ticket pull she is a senior, and her transcript confirms that she is a master’s degree candidate. Though she may be hard to define on paper, there is no questioning her belonging at Texas A&M University.

Robertson, a Florida native, skipped ninth grade, completed her high school and associate degrees, was accepted to the Texas A&M Business Honors program and earned the funds to cover out-of-state tuition, all before the age of 18.

“I came to Texas A&M because when I visited the campus it became apparent that the core values and traditions are practiced every day, and it was not just a nice sentiment,” she said. “I saw the core values of excellence, integrity, leadership, loyalty, respect and selfless service listed on banners throughout campus and how people carried themselves. Their actions matched their words.”

In the spring of 2014, with only one semester completed, Robertson participated in the Mays Business School career fair. Unlike most freshmen, she did not attend to practice her interviewing skills or to be offered an internship. Instead she went in hopes of finding a job. On the list of participating companies, none looked more appealing than NASA.

“I have always loved space and they would give me the opportunity to incorporate space, mathematics and accounting into my work,” she said.
The next day she was called and asked to apply for co-op at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston. The program would accept 40 students from around the world, and out of those 40, only eight business majors would be selected. Of the eight chosen, she and Jess Sepe, a Marine veteran and a junior management major, were the only two from Texas A&M.

“Having an accounting degree and getting my master’s in MIS really set me apart from the rest of the applicants,” she said. “I am very grateful to A&M for giving me that opportunity.”

Robertson was required to participate in a two-day orientation. Upon arrival, she knew she was in the right place. “Driving in there is a long row of palm trees that remind me of my home in Florida, and the model planes above your head at the entrance is like Disney World for space lovers,” she said.
Once there, she was assigned to the International Space Station Branch in the resource management office. She was given a mentor and was immediately welcomed into the NASA community. One reason for her quick acceptance was the strong Aggie presence at the Johnson Space Center.

“There were so many Aggies with a real connection and bond. You could walk down the hall and ‘Whoop!” Robertson said. “I knew this was where I wanted to work.”
Though her acceptance came easily, the workload did not. She was responsible for the entire space station’s travel reports and budget, which accounted for more than a quarter of a million dollars. Her daily tasks included collecting variances, detecting and resolving anomalies to reduce spending.
“I was given the same workload as my mentor from the beginning,” she said. “They treated me like I already worked there. It was nice that they value you to that degree.”

Her main project was reviewing the Internal Task Agreements (ITAs). She helped with $82 million of ITA’s from multiple NASA centers and variety of International Space Station projects. When she was not working, she was volunteering with Pathways Interns Professional Events (PIPE), Pathways Across Centers (PAXC), and Habitat for Humanity Aerospace Games. She was apart of organizing and conducting lectures, participating in NASA tours, joint ventures spreading NASA lectures, and worked the Orion Launch Party event at Space Center Houston. On the weekends she would return to College Station for football games with her peers from NASA. “Everyone was interested in the spirit of Aggieland,” Robertson said.

At the end of her first tour she was required to demonstrate her findings and contributions in a presentation to upper management NASA and the Chief Financial Officer. She will return for her following two terms in the summers of 2015 and 2016.

She credits her freshman Business Honors classes for a lot of her success. “My classes offered real-world examples in enriching and engaging ways, and taught us that if we follow our passions, we will be able to succeed,” she said.

In between NASA tours, Robertson is involved in the Aggie Investment Club, Texas Runners Against Cancer, PPA Business and Texas Republicans. She also recently joined the Business Honors recruiting team, where she will help spread her knowledge to other prospective honors students.

“I think it is important to be a goal-oriented, proficient and multifaceted person, but do not be afraid to seek out advice from others,” Robertson advices.
She plans to graduate from Texas A&M in December 2016 with a bachelor’s in accounting and a master’s in MIS, then join NASA as a full-time employee.

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL
Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,600 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Catagories: Mays Business, Students

Camp Life

Fifteen MBA students teamed up with Camp LIFE to create and hold the first Camp LIFE Family Day Camp, which attracted 51 campers in April. The MBA student volunteers paired up with their campers and families to support and encourage each camper throughout the day. This year, family members also were invited to stay at the camp to witness the nurturing environment provided for their children.

MBA Students Helping Our Community is a student organization for graduate students that focuses on giving back to the community. MBA SHOC does this by providing assistance to local, national and international charities through community service and fundraising events. Members participate in many community initiatives such as The Big Event, Habitat for Humanity, Special Olympics-Texas and Camp Life.

Since 2010, MBA SHOC has been a primary sponsor of Camp LIFE, a unique and inclusive camping adventure for children with disabilities and their siblings. In the past, the MBA students have raised money every winter through fundraisers to help support camper sponsorships, but this year they wanted a more hands-on experience.

Amy Sharp, associate director of Camp Life, said she saw the students gain an incredible amount of comfort with disability by volunteering for Camp LIFE. “The MBA SHOC gained cultural competency in a culture often forgotten, the culture of disability. I saw these individuals grow in one day. At the end of the day the MBA SHOC members were confident, important role models to the campers.”

The groups participated in horseback riding, barnyard petting, fishing, canoeing, creating art and archery. Parents of the 27 youngsters shared their gratitude and appreciation for the Camp LIFE Family Day Camp and the Mays MBA students.

Chad Riley, president of MBA SHOC, said the event helped members exemplify selfless service, a Texas A&M University core value. “Our organization felt that creating an event with the campers would allow us to be a more effective partner, broaden our experiences, and give us an opportunity to have a great time while serving others,” he said. “This was one way for us to sacrifice a day off to serve our community and be there for families of children with disabilities. Each of us learned what it means to hold to these values. ”

Riley said the camp helps give the MBA students a greater respect for parents of children with disabilities. “We learned there is more to service than sending a check, and we have a better understanding of how we can make helping our neighbors a way of life.”

Bench

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL
Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Catagories: Students, Texas A&M

Casey Gattshall '15, PPA Finance, 2013-14 Gathright Scholar
Casey Gattshall ’15, PPA Finance,
2013-14 Gathright Scholar

Business does not mean busyness, nor is busyness a measure of importance. I must admit, I have fallen for this fallacy virtually every semester of my college career. Every semester I tell myself that this one is going to be different, that I’m going to learn how to say no. Yet, towards the end of every semester I find myself more impatient and irritable, less excited and purposeful than I know I need to be. Sleep, “me time”, or doing anything spontaneous is at a premium. I hardly have enough time to fit everything on my planner that I have committed to doing each day.

I believe it all points to one thing: I am prone to associating busyness with importance and have had that pounded into my head over and over. Albert Einstein once said, “”Being busy does not always mean real work. The object of all work is production or accomplishment and to either of these ends there must be forethought, system, planning, intelligence, and honest purpose, as well as perspiration. Seeming to do is not doing.” Einstein is spot on. Don’t allow yourself to get too “busy” to slow down, plan, think, and even rest.

Don’t get me wrong, I believe there is tremendous value in hard work. In fact, I also agree with Einstein’s quote, “A genius is often merely a talented person who has done all of his or her homework.” You can’t expect to learn something or master it if you don’t put in the time. However, there is a fine line between what Einstein was talking about and falling into the trap that Vernon Law describes when he says “Some people are so busy learning the tricks of the trade that they never learn the trade.” Disassociate business and importance with busyness; I am learning more and more every day that they are not necessarily synonymous. Living your life with intentionality and for a greater purpose is a noble pursuit– living to see how much you can fit on your plate for the sake of seeing how much you can fit on your plate is not.

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Catagories: Departments, Students, Texas A&M

Mays Business School’s Center for the Management of Information Systems invites all Texas A&M University students interested in a career in IT and current IT professionals to attend its 15th annual Women in IT Conference. The event will be held on Friday, March 21, 2014 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m in room 2400 of Texas A&M’s Memorial Student Center.

This year’s theme is “High Tea with IT.” Tea and coffee will be served at check-in, and lunch will be provided. Along with games and door prizes, the event will host faculty and industry speakers, including Renee Schroeder, Assistant Vice President — Application Development at USAA, and Melissa Moloney Walk, senior manager at Accenture.

The event will also offer roundtable discussions to allow students to have opportunities to speak with other women in the IT industry. These discussions will cover tips and techniques related to networking, maintaining a work-life balance and becoming a successful leader.

The event is $10 for current students, $25 for former students and industry and free for CMIS board members.

For more information, visit cmis.tamu.edu or contact Heidi Matthews at CMIS@mays.tamu.edu.

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Catagories: Centers, Students, Texas A&M

Any Texas A&M University student interested in entering the annual Raymond Ideas Challenge can attend a workshop on Wednesday (March 5) in Wehner 190 and Thursday (March 6) in Rudder 302. Both will be from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

All students from across campus are encouraged to participate in the challenge by dreaming up the next great product or service and submitting their “big idea” in a written essay and two-minute video pitch.

The competition entry deadline is Friday, March 21, and the event is on April 30.  The host is Texas A&M’s Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship, which is at Mays Business School.

The Raymond Ideas Challenge is designed to foster an entrepreneurial mindset in Texas A&M students.

The students’  concepts will be presented to panels of judges from the business and academic community, who will challenge the students with questions. Students receive valuable experience developing business concepts and improving their writing and presentation skills. The competition also provides networking opportunities with the judges.

New this year is an online voting system, which will be used to select recipients of of $1,000, $500 and $250 prizes.

Assistance is needed in screening entries, and the opportunity is open to anyone in the community. If interested, contact Shanna Spencer at 979-845-0619 or sspencer@mays.tamu.edu.

For more information on the Raymond Ideas Challenge, go to tx.ag/ideasvideo or visit cnve.tamu.edu/programs/ideas-challenge.

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Catagories: Centers, Programs, Students, Texas A&M

Doss Cunningham '04
Doss Cunningham ’04

Doss Cunningham ’04 lives life according to his personal mantra: grow and give back. Cunningham, a graduate of the Professional Program in Accounting at Mays Business School, personifies an entrepreneurial spirit and a willingness to take risks in order to succeed.

Formerly on the way to becoming an accountant after graduation, Cunningham shifted directions when he learned more about Woodbolt International, a nutraceutical company based in Bryan. He was immediately drawn to the company but says family and friends were skeptical of his decision to join the startup. “Other people saw the risks,” he recently told a group of Mays Business Honors students. “I saw the opportunities.” After a few years at the company, Cunningham took over as Chief Executive Officer.

Founded in 2003, Woodbolt International supplies nutritional supplements to retailers in over 40 countries, including major clients such as GNC, Vitamin Shoppe and Costco. Woodbolt is growing rapidly: from $1 million in revenue and five employees when Cunningham joined in 2004 to a revenue run rate of $225 million and 130 employees today. Texas Monthly has also recognized the company in its ranking of the top 100 workplaces in Texas. Official rankings come out in April.

Cunningham praised the Bryan/College Station area for its great startup culture. “There is a lot of intellectual capital here,” he said. Cunningham credits Mays Business School in particular for helping build the foundation for his success. “Mays really gave me the tools and the skillset to be successful as an entrepreneur,” he said.

The chief executive described Woodbolt’s core values: fun, excellence, innovation, service, quality and, perhaps most importantly, people. “Our culture is about building effective people, not just effective business professionals,” said Cunningham. “Everything we do is about people.” The company encourages collaboration and fun among its coworkers, and is involved with local charities. Woodbolt also places a high emphasis on building trust with its customers and doing the right thing for product end users.

However, Cunningham especially emphasized the importance of clarifying a sense of personal identity and happiness and using these insights to forge the right career path. “You only get one chance at life,” said Cunningham. “There’s no better time in your life than now to take a risk.”

Sarah Solcher ’15 reflected on the event as a positive learning experience. “I truly enjoyed hearing from Mr. Cunningham because he shared big picture advice encouraging entrepreneurship as well as day-to-day actions that led to his success,” she said. “I was encouraged to evaluate and confirm my life purpose to be effective in my personal and professional lives.”

Cunningham explained to the students that with the right attitude and a unique skillset, anyone could be an entrepreneur. “You don’t have to be an idea guy or an inventor to be an entrepreneur,” he said. “What a lot of people don’t have is a business background. That was something I was able to bring to the company.”

Cunningham offered five key takeaways for the students:

  1. Don’t be afraid to fail, because you grow through failure.
  2. Define your purpose and what will make you truly happy.
  3. Maintain a work-life balance; it is critical to learn how to manage both your personal and professional lives.
  4. Never stop pursuing education, whether it is through mentors, books, conferences or another outlet.
  5. Be confident enough to make tough decisions and stand by them.

“Mr. Cunningham encouraged us to find a life mantra and to have confidence in ourselves,” said Joshua Scott ’14.

Cunningham described his own life purpose as using his success and many blessings to give back to others, especially by serving as a mentor. He said his most rewarding opportunity has been hiring and developing people.

“What are you ultimately trying to do in life?” he asked the students. “The answer to this question is your compass.”

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Catagories: Executive Speakers, Programs, Students, Texas A&M